Forbes feature article on Haspel seersucker | FORBES.COM | JULY 2018

July 26, 2018

Forbes feature article on Haspel seersucker | FORBES.COM |  JULY 2018

Seersucker is a thin, puckered, cotton fabric commonly striped or chequered, used to make clothing for spring and summer wear. The word came into English from Persian, and originates from the words sheer and shakar, literally meaning "milk and sugar", probably from the resemblance of its smooth and rough stripes to the smooth texture of milk and the bumpy texture of sugar. Seersucker is woven in such a way that some threads bunch together, giving the fabric a wrinkled appearance in places. This feature causes the fabric to be mostly held away from the skin when worn, facilitating heat dissipation and air circulation. During the British empire where incidentally, the sun never set, seersucker was a popular material in Britain's warm weather colonies such as India and Africa. And for us yankees, the fabric was originally worn by the poor in the U.S. until preppy undergraduate students began wearing it in the 1920s in an air of reverse snobbery similar to how we see street wear today reversing to the higher echelons of Louis Vuitton and Dior Homme. 

 

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